West Yellowstone Attractions

Established on March 1, 1872, Yellowstone National Park is the first and oldest national park in the world.
Preserved within Yellowstone are Old Faithful Geyser and some 10,000 hot springs and geysers, the majority of the planet's total. These geothermal wonders are evidence of one of the world's largest active volcanoes; its last eruption created a crater or caldera that spans almost half of the park.

An outstanding mountain wildland with clean water and air, Yellowstone is home of the grizzly bear and wolf, and free-ranging herds of bison and elk. It is the core of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, one of the largest intact temperate zone ecosystems remaining on the planet.

The human history of the park dates back 12,000 years. The events of the last 130 years of park history are reflected in the historic structures and sites associated with various periods of park administration and visitor facilities development. -------------------> More About Yellowstone

yellowstone fly-fisher
Madison River Fly-fisherman

The legendary trout waters of the Madison River originate at Madison Junction inYellowstone National Park where the Gibbon and Firehole come together to form the Madison. It was here in late summer of 1870 in what is known as National Park Meadows that the Langford-Washburn-Doane expedition conceived making Yellowstone a national park.

The Madison River is a headwater tributary of the Missouri River and is approximately 180 miles long starting in Yellowstone and flows to its confluence with the Jefferson and Gallatin rivers near Three Forks Montana to join the Jefferson and Gallatin rivers at The Missouri River Headwaters State Park. Meriwether Lewis at Three Forks named the Madison River in July 1805. The central fork of the three, it was named for U.S. Secretary of State James Madison, who would succeed Thomas Jefferson as President in 1809.----------------> More about Madison River

The Gallatin River of southwestern Montana is a beautiful freestone trout stream that doubles as a whitewater adventure destination, it is an amazingly scenic The Gallatin is a well-known, easily accessible, and heavily fished, trout stream that, despite those pitfalls, offers three species of trout that eagerly take dry flies and nymphs in one of the most beautiful and rugged portions of Montana.

The Gallatin has 120 miles of appealing trout water, including a delicate upper portion that flows through lush meadows, a roily middle section that cuts through a spectacular, heavily forested canyon, and a lower stretch that twists across a broad valley before meeting the Jefferson and Madison rivers at Three Forks. Parts of the movie A River Runs Through It were filmed on the Gallatin. The river winds through high alpine meadows, dropping into the rocky Gallatin Canyon, and flowing out into the Gallatin Valley. It is also known as a blue-ribbon trout water. It is a tremendous asset to the communities of Bozeman, Big Sky and West Yellowstone.--------------------> More about Gallatin River

Gallatin River Fly-fisherman
Hebgen Lake, West Yellowstone Montana

Hebgen Lake is a lake located in Southwest Montana. It is well known for an earthquake which occurred nearby on August 17, 1959, forming Quake Lake which is located immediately downstream.

Recreation
Hebgen Lake and the surrounding area offer many recreational activities: camping, fishing, boating, and hiking. Campgrounds include Rainbow Point and Cherry Creek. Rainbow Point is the largest campground on the lake, offering four "loops." Each loop contains approximately 20 campsites. Each campsite can accommodate a full-size camper and one or two vehicles.

Quake Lake (also known as Earthquake Lake) is a lake in southwestern Montana, United States. It was created after a massive earthquake struck on August 17, 1959. Today, Quake Lake is 190 feet (58 m) deep and six miles (10 km) long. US 287 follows the lake and offers glimpses of the effects of the earthquake and landslide and allows access to a visitor center. The lake is mostly within Gallatin National Forest. quake lake, west yellowstone montana
Grand Teton Park's Limbar Pine Established in 1929, Grand Teton National Park emerged from a complicated and controversial series of events. The park first consisted of the mountain range and several glacial lakes. Later the valley floor was protected as Jackson Hole National Monument. The two areas were combined in 1950.
Today the park encompasses nearly 310,000 acres and protects the Teton Range, Jackson Hole (mountain valley), a 50-mile portion of the Snake River, seven morainal lakes, over 100 backcountry and alpine lakes, and a wide range of wildlife and plant species.
The park is also rich in a cultural history that includes seven eras of human history: early peoples (paleo-indians), Native Americans (modern tribes), fur trappers, homesteaders, ranchers/farmers, conservationists, and recreationalists. Climbing, hiking and backpacking, camping, fishing, wildlife and bird watching, horseback riding, boating on Jackson and Jenny Lakes, rafting on the Snake River, bicycling, and photography are all common activities in the area.
About 4 million visitors enjoy the park each year, most visit between Memorial Day Weekend and Labor Day.-----------------> More about Grand Teton National Park

Just across the border in Idaho the Caribou-Targhee National Forest occupies over 3 million acres and stretches across southeastern Idaho, from the Montana, Utah, and Wyoming borders. Most the Caribou-Targhee National Forest lies in eastern Idaho, western Wyoming, and northern Utah, with a significant portion situated adjacent to Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks,

The Caribou-Targhee National Forest lies almost entirely within "the Greater Yellowstone Area" or "the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem," an area of over 12 million acres and is the largest block of relatively undisturbed plant and animal habitat in the contiguous United States. The area continues to gain prominence for its ecological integrity. The United Nations has identified the area as a Biosphere Reserve. ----------> More about Caribou-Targhee National Forest

Targhee creek trail, Caribou Targhee National Forest
Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Nowhere else in the United States, including Alaska, can the casual visitor observe such a striking diversity of "charismatic mega-fauna" (the large mammals) that abound in this region, Bald eagles, golden eagles, black bear, the elusive cougar, the wolverine, the pine marten and the gray wolf. Jackson Hole and Yellowstone are home to that most formidable icon of wildness, the grizzly bear. The region also hosts the largest herds of elk in North America and is one of the few remaining areas in the lower 48 states where the grizzly bear still roams in significant numbers, and is home to the largest free-ranging herd of bison in the lower 48 states. ---------------> More about Yellowstone's Wildlife

A Not-for-Profit Wildlife Park and Educational Facility

Open 365 days a year
(GWDC bears do not hibernate)
Admission is good for two consecutive days

The Grizzly & Wolf Discovery Center offers every visitor to Yellowstone a chance to uniquely experience
the world of grizzly bears and gray wolves. All the animals at the Center are unable to survive in the wild
and serve as ambassadors for their wild counterparts.

Accredited by the Association of Zoos & Aquariums

Gallatin National Forest Located in southern Montana, the Gallatin National Forest has snowy peaks, alpine meadows, and scenic canyons. The Forest is brimming with abundant wildlife, dense timbered valleys and ridges with rugged peaks climbing to nearly 10,000 feet. Recreational activities like hiking, fishing, and snow sports are popular, while some of the streams are excellent for paddlers.

 

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